CS 280 in 202210

Meetings

Office Hours and Semester Schedule

Times Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri
08:30-09:00 CS-280 DHH URC CS-280 DHH URC
09:00-09:30
09:30-10:00
10:00-10:30 Office Office
10:30-11:00
11:00-11:30
11:30-12:00
12:00-12:30
12:30-13:00
13:00-13:30 CS-730 DHH URC CS-730 DHH URC
13:30-14:00 CS-499+900 DHH URC CS-499+900 DHH URC CS-499+900 DHH URC
14:00-14:30
14:30-15:00 Office Office
15:00-15:30
15:30-16:00
16:00-16:30
16:30-17:00
17:00-17:30

Topics

Topics and Learning Outcomes for the Knowledge Units, within the Knowledge Areas, explored in this course are based on the ACM/IEEE Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Degree Programs in Computer Science (2013) report, a version of which is available in HTML on this website . That report associates one of three levels of mastery with each Learning Outcome. The mastery levels are defined as:

  • Familiarity: The student understands what a concept is or what it means. This level of mastery concerns a basic awareness of a concept as opposed to expecting real facility with its application. It provides an answer to the question “What do you know about this?”
  • Usage: The student is able to use or apply a concept in a concrete way. Using a concept may include, for example, appropriately using a specific concept in a program, using a particular proof technique, or performing a particular analysis. It provides an answer to the question “What do you know how to do?”
  • Assessment: The student is able to consider a concept from multiple viewpoints and/or justify the selection of a particular approach to solve a problem. This level of mastery implies more than using a concept; it involves the ability to select an appropriate approach from understood alternatives. It provides an answer to the question “Why would you do that?”

Topics and Learning Outcomes with:

  • 2 stars ( ★ ★ ) appear in the CS2013 report as Core-Tier1
  • 1 star ( ★ ) appear in the CS2013 report as Core-Tier2
  • 0 stars appear in the CS2013 report as Elective
  • grey text are not covered in this course offering

SP / Social Context

Computers and the Internet, perhaps more than any other technologies, have transformed society over the past 75 years, with dramatic increases in human productivity; an explosion of options for news, entertainment, and communication; and fundamental breakthroughs in almost every branch of science and engineering. Social Context provides the foundation for all other SP knowledge units, especially Professional Ethics. Also see cross-referencing with Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Networking and Communication (NC) Knowledge Areas.

Topics
  1. Social implications of computing in a networked world (cross-reference HCI/Foundations/social models; IAS/Fundamental Concepts/social issues) ★★
  2. Impact of social media on individualism, collectivism and culture. ★★
  3. Growth and control of the Internet (cross-reference NC/Introduction/organization of the Internet) ★
  4. Often referred to as the digital divide, differences in access to digital technology resources and its resulting ramifications for gender, class, ethnicity, geography, and/or underdeveloped countries. ★
  5. Accessibility issues, including legal requirements ★
  6. Context-aware computing (cross-reference HCI/New Interactive Technologies)/ ubiquitous and context-aware) ★
Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe positive and negative ways in which computer technology (networks, mobile computing, cloud computing) alters modes of social interaction at the personal level. [Familiarity] ★★
  2. Identify developers’ assumptions and values embedded in hardware and software design, especially as they pertain to usability for diverse populations including under-represented populations and the disabled. [Familiarity] ★★
  3. Interpret the social context of a given design and its implementation. [Familiarity] ★★
  4. Evaluate the efficacy of a given design and implementation using empirical data. [Assessment] ★★
  5. Summarize the implications of social media on individualism versus collectivism and culture. [Usage] ★★
  6. Discuss how Internet access serves as a liberating force for people living under oppressive forms of government; explain how limits on Internet access are used as tools of political and social repression. [Familiarity] ★
  7. Analyze the pros and cons of reliance on computing in the implementation of democracy (e.g. delivery of social services, electronic voting). [Assessment] ★
  8. Describe the impact of the under-representation of diverse populations in the computing profession (e.g., industry culture, product diversity). [Familiarity] ★
  9. Explain the implications of context awareness in ubiquitous computing systems. [Familiarity] ★

SP / Analytical Tools

Preamble

Ethical theories and principles are the foundations of ethical analysis because they are the viewpoints from which guidance can be obtained along the pathway to a decision. Each theory emphasizes different points such as predicting the outcome and following one’s duties to others in order to reach an ethically guided decision. However, in order for an ethical theory to be useful, the theory must be directed towards a common set of goals. Ethical principles are the common goals that each theory tries to achieve in order to be successful. These goals include beneficence, least harm, respect for autonomy, and justice.

Topics
  1. Ethical argumentation ★★
  2. Ethical theories and decision-making ★★
  3. Moral assumptions and values ★★
Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate stakeholder positions in a given situation. [Assessment] ★★
  2. Analyze basic logical fallacies in an argument. [Assessment] ★★
  3. Analyze an argument to identify premises and conclusion. [Assessment] ★★
  4. Illustrate the use of example and analogy in ethical argument. [Usage] ★★
  5. Evaluate ethical/social tradeoffs in technical decisions. [Assessment] ★★

SP / Professional Ethics

Computer ethics is a branch of practical philosophy that deals with how computing professionals should make decisions regarding professional and social conduct. There are three primary influences: 1) an individual’s own personal code; 2) any informal code of ethical behavior existing in the work place; and 3) exposure to formal codes of ethics. See cross-referencing with the Information Assurance and Security (IAS) Knowledge Area.

Topics
  1. Community values and the laws by which we live ★★
  2. The nature of professionalism including care, attention and discipline, fiduciary responsibility, and mentoring ★★
  3. Keeping up-to-date as a computing professional in terms of familiarity, tools, skills, legal and professional framework as well as the ability to self-assess and progress in the computing field ★★
  4. Professional certification, codes of ethics, conduct, and practice, such as the ACM/IEEE-CS, SE, AITP, IFIP and international societies (cross-reference IAS/Fundamental Concepts/ethical issues) ★★
  5. Accountability, responsibility and liability (e.g. software correctness, reliability and safety, as well as ethical confidentiality of cybersecurity professionals) ★★
  6. The role of the computing professional in public policy ★
  7. Maintaining awareness of consequences ★
  8. Ethical dissent and whistle-blowing ★
  9. The relationship between regional culture and ethical dilemmas ★
  10. Dealing with harassment and discrimination ★
  11. Forms of professional credentialing ★
  12. Acceptable use policies for computing in the workplace ★
  13. Ergonomics and healthy computing environments ★
  14. Time to market and cost considerations versus quality professional standards ★
Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify ethical issues that arise in software development and determine how to address them technically and ethically. [Familiarity] ★★
  2. Explain the ethical responsibility of ensuring software correctness, reliability and safety. [Familiarity] ★★
  3. Describe the mechanisms that typically exist for a professional to keep up-to-date. [Familiarity] ★★
  4. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of relevant professional codes as expressions of professionalism and guides to decision-making. [Familiarity] ★★
  5. Analyze a global computing issue, observing the role of professionals and government officials in managing this problem. [Assessment] ★★
  6. Evaluate the professional codes of ethics from the ACM, the IEEE Computer Society, and other organizations. [Assessment] ★★
  7. Describe ways in which professionals may contribute to public policy. [Familiarity] ★
  8. Describe the consequences of inappropriate professional behavior. [Familiarity] ★
  9. Identify progressive stages in a whistle-blowing incident. [Familiarity] ★
  10. Identify examples of how regional culture interplays with ethical dilemmas. [Familiarity] ★
  11. Investigate forms of harassment and discrimination and avenues of assistance. [Usage] ★
  12. Examine various forms of professional credentialing. [Usage] ★
  13. Explain the relationship between ergonomics in computing environments and people’s health. [Familiarity] ★
  14. Develop a computer usage/acceptable use policy with enforcement measures. [Assessment] ★
  15. Describe issues associated with industries’ push to focus on time to market versus enforcing quality professional standards. [Familiarity] ★

SP / Intellectual Property

Preamble

Intellectual property refers to a range of intangible rights of ownership in an asset such as a software program. Each intellectual property ‘right’ is itself an asset. The law provides different methods for protecting these rights of ownership based on their type. There are essentially four types of intellectual property rights relevant to software: patents, copyrights, trade secrets and trademarks. Each affords a different type of legal protection. See cross-referencing with the Information Management (IM) Knowledge Area.

Topics
  1. Philosophical foundations of intellectual property 
  2. Intellectual property rights (cross-reference IM/Information Storage and Retrieval/intellectual property and protection) 
  3. Intangible digital intellectual property (IDIP) 
  4. Legal foundations for intellectual property protection 
  5. Digital rights management 
  6. Copyrights, patents, trade secrets, trademarks 
  7. Plagiarism 
  8. Foundations of the open source movement 
  9. Software piracy 
Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss the philosophical bases of intellectual property. [Familiarity] 
  2. Discuss the rationale for the legal protection of intellectual property. [Familiarity] 
  3. Describe legislation aimed at digital copyright infringements. [Familiarity] 
  4. Critique legislation aimed at digital copyright infringements. [Assessment] 
  5. Identify contemporary examples of intangible digital intellectual property. [Familiarity] 
  6. Justify uses of copyrighted materials. [Assessment] 
  7. Evaluate the ethical issues inherent in various plagiarism detection mechanisms. [Assessment] 
  8. Interpret the intent and implementation of software licensing. [Familiarity] 
  9. Discuss the issues involved in securing software patents. [Familiarity] 
  10. Characterize and contrast the concepts of copyright, patenting and trademarks. [Assessment] 
  11. Identify the goals of the open source movement. [Familiarity] 
  12. Identify the global nature of software piracy. [Familiarity] 

SP / Privacy and Civil Liberties

Preamble

Electronic information sharing highlights the need to balance privacy protections with information access. The ease of digital access to many types of data makes privacy rights and civil liberties more complex, differing among the variety of cultures worldwide. See crossreferencing with the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Information Assurance and Security (IAS), Information Management (IM), and Intelligent Systems (IS) Knowledge Areas.

Topics
  1. Philosophical foundations of privacy rights (cross-reference IS/Fundamental Issues/philosophical issues) 
  2. Legal foundations of privacy protection 
  3. Privacy implications of widespread data collection for transactional databases, data warehouses, surveillance systems, and cloud computing (cross-reference IM/Database Systems/data independence; IM/Data Mining/data cleaning) 
  4. Ramifications of differential privacy 
  5. Technology-based solutions for privacy protection (cross-reference IAS/Threats and Attacks/attacks on privacy and anonymity) 
  6. Privacy legislation in areas of practice 
  7. Civil liberties and cultural differences 
  8. Freedom of expression and its limitations 
Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss the philosophical basis for the legal protection of personal privacy. [Familiarity] 
  2. Evaluate solutions to privacy threats in transactional databases and data warehouses. [Assessment] 
  3. Describe the role of data collection in the implementation of pervasive surveillance systems (e.g., RFID, face recognition, toll collection, mobile computing). [Familiarity] 
  4. Describe the ramifications of differential privacy. [Familiarity] 
  5. Investigate the impact of technological solutions to privacy problems. [Usage] 
  6. Critique the intent, potential value and implementation of various forms of privacy legislation. [Assessment] 
  7. Identify strategies to enable appropriate freedom of expression. [Familiarity] 

SP / Professional Communication

Professional communication conveys technical information to various audiences who may have very different goals and needs for that information. Effective professional communication of technical information is rarely an inherited gift, but rather needs to be taught in context throughout the undergraduate curriculum. See cross-referencing with Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Software Engineering (SE) Knowledge Areas.

Topics
  1. Reading, understanding and summarizing technical material, including source code and documentation ★★
  2. Writing effective technical documentation and materials ★★
  3. Dynamics of oral, written, and electronic team and group communication (cross-reference HCI/Collaboration and Communication/group communication; SE/Project Management/team participation) ★★
  4. Communicating professionally with stakeholders ★★
  5. Utilizing collaboration tools (cross-reference HCI/Collaboration and Communication/online communities; IS/Agents/collaborative agents) ★★
  6. Dealing with cross-cultural environments (cross-reference HCI/User-Centered Design and Testing/crosscultural evaluation) 
  7. Tradeoffs of competing risks in software projects, such as technology, structure/process, quality, people, market and financial (cross-reference SE/Software Project Management/Risk) 
Learning Outcomes
  1. Write clear, concise, and accurate technical documents following well-defined standards for format and for including appropriate tables, figures, and references. [Usage] ★★
  2. Evaluate written technical documentation to detect problems of various kinds. [Assessment] ★★
  3. Develop and deliver a good quality formal presentation. [Assessment] ★★
  4. Plan interactions (e.g. virtual, face-to-face, shared documents) with others in which they are able to get their point across, and are also able to listen carefully and appreciate the points of others, even when they disagree, and are able to convey to others what they have heard. [Usage] ★★
  5. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of various forms of communication (e.g. virtual, face-to-face, shared documents). [Familiarity] ★★
  6. Examine appropriate measures used to communicate with stakeholders involved in a project. [Usage] ★★
  7. Compare and contrast various collaboration tools. [Assessment] ★★
  8. Discuss ways to influence performance and results in cross-cultural teams. [Familiarity] 
  9. Examine the tradeoffs and common sources of risk in software projects regarding technology, structure/process, quality, people, market and financial. [Usage] 
  10. Evaluate personal strengths and weaknesses to work remotely as part of a multinational team. [Assessment] 

HCI / Foundations

Motivation

For end-users, the interface is the system. So design in this domain must be interaction-focused and human-centered. Students need a different repertoire of techniques to address this than is provided elsewhere in the curriculum.

Topics
  1. Contexts for HCI (anything with a user interface, e.g., webpage, business applications, mobile applications, and games) ★★
  2. Processes for user-centered development, e.g., early focus on users, empirical testing, iterative design ★★
  3. Different measures for evaluation, e.g., utility, efficiency, learnability, user satisfaction ★★
  4. Usability heuristics and the principles of usability testing ★★
  5. Physical capabilities that inform interaction design, e.g., color perception, ergonomics ★★
  6. Cognitive models that inform interaction design, e.g., attention, perception and recognition, movement, and memory; gulfs of expectation and execution ★★
  7. Social models that inform interaction design, e.g., culture, communication, networks and organizations ★★
  8. Principles of good design and good designers; engineering tradeoffs ★★
  9. Accessibility, e.g., interfaces for differently-abled populations (e.g., blind, motion-impaired) ★★
  10. Interfaces for differently-aged population groups (e.g., children, 80+) ★★
Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss why human-centered software development is important. [Familiarity] ★★
  2. Summarize the basic precepts of psychological and social interaction. [Familiarity] ★★
  3. Develop and use a conceptual vocabulary for analyzing human interaction with software: affordance, conceptual model, feedback, and so forth. [Usage] ★★
  4. Define a user-centered design process that explicitly takes account of the fact that the user is not like the developer or their acquaintances. [Usage] ★★
  5. Create and conduct a simple usability test for an existing software application. [Assessment] ★★

HCI / Designing Interaction

Motivation

CS students need a minimal set of well-established methods and tools to bring to interface construction.

Topics
  1. Principles of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) 
  2. Elements of visual design (layout, colour, fonts, labelling) 
  3. Task analysis, including qualitative aspects of generating task analytic models 
  4. Low-fidelity (paper) prototyping 
  5. Quantitative evaluation techniques, e.g., keystroke-level evaluation 
  6. Help and documentation 
  7. Handling human/system failure 
  8. User interface standards 
Learning Outcomes
  1. For an identified user group, undertake and document an analysis of their needs. [Assessment] 
  2. Create a simple application, together with help and documentation, that supports a graphical user interface. [Usage] 
  3. Conduct a quantitative evaluation and discuss/report the results. [Usage] 
  4. Discuss at least one national or international user interface design standard. [Familiarity] 

SP / Sustainability

Preamble

Sustainability is characterized by the United Nations as ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.’ Sustainability was first introduced in the CS2008 curricular guidelines. Topics in this emerging area can be naturally integrated into other familiarity areas and units, such as human-computer interaction and software evolution. See cross-referencing with the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Software Engineering (SE) Knowledge Areas.

Topics
  1. Being a sustainable practitioner by taking into consideration cultural and environmental impacts of implementation decisions (e.g. organizational policies, economic viability, and resource consumption). 
  2. Explore global social and environmental impacts of computer use and disposal (e-waste) 
  3. Environmental impacts of design choices in specific areas such as algorithms, operating systems, networks, databases, or human-computer interaction (cross-reference SE/Software Evaluation/software evolution; HCI/Design-Oriented HCI/sustainability) 
  4. Guidelines for sustainable design standards 
  5. Systemic effects of complex computer-mediated phenomena (e.g. telecommuting or web shopping) 
  6. Pervasive computing; information processing integrated into everyday objects and activities, such as smart energy systems, social networking and feedback systems to promote sustainable behavior, transportation, environmental monitoring, citizen science and activism. 
  7. Research on applications of computing to environmental issues, such as energy, pollution, resource usage, recycling and reuse, food management, farming and others. 
  8. The interdependence of the sustainability of software systems with social systems, including the knowledge and skills of its users, organizational processes and policies, and its societal context (e.g., market forces, government policies). 
Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify ways to be a sustainable practitioner. [Familiarity] 
  2. Illustrate global social and environmental impacts of computer use and disposal (e-waste). [Usage] 
  3. Describe the environmental impacts of design choices within the field of computing that relate to algorithm design, operating system design, networking design, database design, etc. [Familiarity] 
  4. Investigate the social and environmental impacts of new system designs through projects. [Usage] 
  5. Identify guidelines for sustainable IT design or deployment. [Familiarity] 
  6. List the sustainable effects of telecommuting or web shopping. [Familiarity] 
  7. Investigate pervasive computing in areas such as smart energy systems, social networking, transportation, agriculture, supply-chain systems, environmental monitoring and citizen activism. [Usage] 
  8. Develop applications of computing and assess through research areas pertaining to environmental issues (e.g. energy, pollution, resource usage, recycling and reuse, food management, farming). [Assessment] 

Assignments

Project Proposal ()

  • Marks: 5
  • Due Date: 18-Feb-2022 @ 23:59

Description

The project can be done individually or in a small group (of up to 4). If you choose to work in a group, list all the group members on the proposal near the top (so that you can be put into a project group together) – only 1 copy of the proposal needs to be submitted. If your project changes after the proposal is submitted, please keep me informed (the goal of the proposal is for you to plan so that changes won’t be necessary).

You may choose what you will do for the project and that will depend on whether you are working individually or in a group. It must deal with class themes in some way, and I am open to your ideas about how you will do it. Some possibilities include:

  • Research Paper
  • Book Review

Start with a careful and critical reading of your chosen book. Describe, analyze, and evaluate your book as well as provide evidence to support your conclusions. Identify the key arguments of the book and how well the author supports them. Some questions to consider:

  • How and what does this work help us to understand about an issue?
  • What types of evidence does the author draw on to support their argument?
  • Does the book do what the author claims that it will do?
  • Are there other types of evidence that the author fails to acknowledge or ignores?
  • Is there a theoretical perspective from which the author writes?
  • How is this book similar to or different from other books on the topic? Why are they similar or different?
  • Are you convinced by the book? Why or why not?

An appropriate structure will include an introduction that provides: identification of the book, author, and any essential historical background needed for context; and a clear and concise evaluation of the book that includes its main argument and its strengths and weaknesses. After the introduction, provide a brief summary or overview of the book. Identify the essential arguments of the book and briefly summarize them. Next will come the evaluation and analysis that contains the bulk of your review where you explain and develop the evaluation made in the introduction. Provide evidence. Finally, conclude with a concise summation of your review.

  • Wikipedia article (create new or add to existing)
  • Create and promote some online content (video [which could be a recording of a presentation with narration], podcast, blog)
  • Picture Yourself as a Computing Professional

Identify and discuss role models for your life as a computing professional. Choose 3 computing professional role models (from the present or past) and write about each one. Include a picture of each, if possible. Reflect on how they inspire you with respect to the Codes of Ethics (including https://ethics.acm.org/) that we are examining in class.

  • Discuss your contributions to an open source project (on github, for example)
  • Write some code to test an idea
Contents and Format of the Proposal

To match the rubric below, use the following headings.

Topic

Describe your topic and how it relates to class. The list of topics and learning outcomes for this semester may be of help. Choose a topic that is new to you (that you haven’t done in your blog entry). If the general topic is similar, please indicate how you will treat it differently, such as from a different perspective.

Deliverable and Rationale

Choose the form in which you will deliver your project. Explain why you are choosing that particular deliverable and explain why it is appropriate for a group or an individual to realize it.

Tentative Plan

Provide a plan, with some milestones, for realizing your chosen deliverable. This plan may look like an outline of what you expect to include. If you are doing this with a group, make clear how each group member will participate in the final deliverable.

Submission
  • submit a well-formatted pdf document on UR Courses
  • target length: 1-2 pages
Grading
Grade penalties will be applied in the following situations for assignment submissions:
  • on time but the written instructions for the submission were not followed: deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late (but within 48 hours of the due date and time): deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late by more than 48 hours: deduct 50% of the earned grade
  • academic dishonesty: deduct 100% of the earned grade

This assignment is worth 5 marks, according to the following rubric:

Rubric

DePaul Univerity’s Center for Teaching and Learning has a useful resource describing the process of creating rubrics. Your comments about the following rubric are welcome via email

Criterion and Weight Exemplary Sufficient Developing Needs Improvement
Topic (1) Topic actively engages an important issue related to class Topic engages an important issue related to class Topic somewhat engages an important issue related to class Topic does not engage an important issue related to class
Deliverable and Rationale (2) Intended deliverable is appropriate and imaginative. Rationale for approach is clear and well-formed Intended deliverable is appropriate. Rationale for approach is reasonable Intended deliverable is somewhat appropriate. Rationale for approach is mostly unclear and not well-formed Intended deliverable is not appropriate. Rationale for approach is not clear
Tentative Plan (2) Ambitious and thorough Reasonably thorough Somewhat thorough Not thorough
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Blog Entry ()

  • Marks: 16
  • Due Date: 11-Mar-2022 @ 23:59

Description

Blogs (short for weblogs) have become an important means of expression in the information society. Personal blog posts are discrete, often informal, diary-style commentaries written by an individual.

Prepare and submit a blog post that deals with a course-related topic that is currently, or was recently, in the news.

The list of knowledge units also includes learning outcomes associated with the topics. If it is helpful, you may consider those learning outcomes as suggestions about how to approach your topic.

Find a personal connection to the topic. You may, for example, evaluate the (consideration of) ethical and social tradeoffs in a technical decision or analyse the role of computer professionals in a global computing issue.

Identify multiple (4-8) reputable online sources to reference in support of your topic. References are to be included as hyperlinks within the post, close to the text that makes the reference. They should also be clearly included in plain text at the end of your work. Also at the end of your work, answer the following questions about each source:

  1. Who is the author?
  2. Who is the publisher?
  3. What is the purpose or prespective of the content?
  4. Is the information provided by the source timely and relevant?
  5. How does this source compare to others?

From Nielsen and Morkes, here are some ways to write for the web:

Conventional Guidelines for Good Writing are Good

Conventional guidelines include carefully organizing the information, using words and categories that make sense to the audience, using topic sentences, limiting each paragraph to one main idea, and providing the right amount of information.

Text Should be Scannable

Scanning can save users time. Most people are likely to approach unfamiliar Web text by trying to scan it before reading it. Elements that enhance scanning include headings, large type, bold text, highlighted text, bulleted lists, graphics, captions, and topic sentences.

Text Should be Concise

Consistent with users’ desire to get information quickly is their preference for short text.

Users Like Summaries and the Inverted Pyramid Style

Web writing that presents news, summaries, and conclusions up front is useful and saves time. A news story written in the inverted pyramid style (in which news and conclusions are presented first, followed by details and background information), are well-received.

Hypertext is Well-Liked

“The incredible thing that’s available on the Web is the ability to go deeper for more information.” However, hypertext may be distracting if a site contains “too many” links.

Nielsen also provides a list of mistakes to avoid, which include the following 3 that are most relevant to us:

  • Nondescript Posting Titles: Users must be able to grasp the gist of an article by reading its headline. Avoid cute or humorous headlines that make no sense out of context.
  • Links Don’t Say Where They Go: Many weblog authors seem to think it’s cool to write link anchors like: “ some people think” or “there’s more here and here .” Remember one of the basics of the Web: Life is too short to click on an unknown. Tell people where they’re going and what they’ll find at the other end of the link. Generally, you should provide predictive information in either the anchor text itself or the immediately surrounding words.
  • Forgetting That You Write for Your Future Boss: Whenever you post anything to the Internet — whether on a weblog, in a discussion group, or even in an email — think about how it will look to a hiring manager in ten years. Once stuff’s out, it’s archived, cached, and indexed in many services that you might never be aware of.

Sample

A sample blog entry, that I wrote a few years ago, can be found at: https://www.itworldcanada.com/blog/wanted-defenders-of-the-public-interest/86095

Submission

Submit your blog entry as HTML, either uploaded as a file or pasted as online text. You may edit your blog entry in your “Individual Student Blog” and copy the HTML from there.

You may optionally choose to post your entry to the “Class Blog”, as evidence of participation.

The target length is 900-1000 words.

Grading
Grade penalties will be applied in the following situations for assignment submissions:
  • on time but the written instructions for the submission were not followed: deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late (but within 48 hours of the due date and time): deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late by more than 48 hours: deduct 50% of the earned grade
  • academic dishonesty: deduct 100% of the earned grade

This assignment is worth 16 marks, according to the following rubric:

Rubric

DePaul Univerity’s Center for Teaching and Learning has a useful resource describing the process of creating rubrics. Your comments about the following rubric are welcome via email

Criterion and Weight Exemplary Sufficient Developing Needs Improvement
Intellectual Engagement with Key Theme-Related Concepts (4) Demonstrates engagement with the important issues raised through readings and/or class activities Makes some reference to issues raised through readings and/or class activities Makes little reference to issues raised through readings and/or class activities Makes no reference to issues raised through readings and/or class activities
Personal Response to Key Theme-Related Concepts (4) Extensive evidence of a personal response to the issues raised in the readings/activities, and demonstrates your growth Some evidence of a personal response to the issues/concepts raised in the readings/activities Little evidence of a personal response to the issues/concepts raised in the readings/activities No personal response is made to the issues/concepts raised in the readings/activities
Critical Evaluation of Online Sources (4) All questions answered thoroughly All questions answered Questions answered somewhat thoroughly Few questions answered
Engaged Writing for the Web (4) Shows a good command of Standard English. No problems for your audience. Blog entry uses recommended style Demonstrates evidence of correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Audience will have little trouble reading your blog. Recommended style is mostly used Shows some evidence of correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Audience will have some trouble reading your blog. Recommended style used occasionally Incorrect grammar and spelling are apparent throughout, making it difficult for others to follow. Recommended style not followed
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Critique of a Blog Entry ()

  • Marks: 4
  • Due Date: 25-Mar-2022 @ 23:59
Description

Critique the blog entry that immediately follows your own blog entry. If yours is the last blog entry 48 hours after submissions are due, you will critique the first entry in the blog. Use the rubric from the Blog Entry assignment when writing your critique.

Submission
  • submit a well-formatted pdf document on URcourses
  • target length: 1-2 pages
Grading
Grade penalties will be applied in the following situations for assignment submissions:
  • on time but the written instructions for the submission were not followed: deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late (but within 48 hours of the due date and time): deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late by more than 48 hours: deduct 50% of the earned grade
  • academic dishonesty: deduct 100% of the earned grade

This assignment is worth 4 marks, according to the following rubric:

Rubric

DePaul Univerity’s Center for Teaching and Learning has a useful resource describing the process of creating rubrics. Your comments about the following rubric are welcome via email

Criterion and Weight Exemplary Sufficient Developing Needs Improvement
Evaluation according to rubric (1) Thorough, honest, and constructive evaluation Honest and constructive evaluation Insufficient effort put into evaluation Evaluation not evident
Critique (3) Provides a substantial assessment of the entry, including the strength of the position taken by the author and the quality of the references used Assessment is reasonably thorough and well-presented Assessment is uneven. Although it may add something new, there are parts needing further development Lacking substance
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Assess Humaneness of Website ()

  • Marks: 10
  • Due Date: 04-Apr-2022 @ 23:59

Description

This is a group assignment and you have been assigned to a group, somewhat randomly, with either 4 or 5 members. You may communicate with your group using the Web Within-Group Discussion Forum. You are not required to use this forum for the whole assignment, but it may help to get you in touch with your fellow group members.

“An interface is humane if it is responsive to human needs and considerate of human frailties.”

As a group, you will assess the humaneness of the Department of Computer Science website in the context of the newly updated University of Regina website. Do this by testing the website content as described in this NN/group article by Hoa Loranger and this NN/group article by Kara Pernice (more focused on intranets)

Look everywhere on the site, as organized by the main links on the CS Home page. Each of the main links has additional content organized in the left-hand navigation menu. The main links are:

  1. Home
  2. People
  3. Undergraduate
  4. Graduate
  5. Classes & Labs
  6. Research
  7. Resources
  8. Contact Us

Consider these questions:

  • is the content valuable to you?
  • is the content accurate, up-to-date, unique, and important?
  • is the valuable content accessible to you?
  • is there some way that you would like to use the content, but it is not clear how to do it?
  • should the content be put elsewhere (UR Courses, Faculty of Science, and so on)?

After your group members have explored the content on the website, create a summary report organized according to the main navigation structure of the site detailed above. You may use the headings below to organize your report either by each main link or as a whole .

Exploration

In-depth exploration of pages on the website.

Content Testing

Meaningful questions considered thoroughly.

Observations

Summary of what your group found.

Recommendations

Your ideas about how the website could be redesigned to make it more attractive and relevant and more humane to students and other visitors.

Submission

  • 1 document (pdf) – only 1 group member needs to submit
  • Target length: 1 or more pages per main navigation link
Grading
Grade penalties will be applied in the following situations for assignment submissions:
  • on time but the written instructions for the submission were not followed: deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late (but within 48 hours of the due date and time): deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late by more than 48 hours: deduct 50% of the earned grade
  • academic dishonesty: deduct 100% of the earned grade

This assignment is worth 10 marks, according to the following rubric:

Rubric

DePaul Univerity’s Center for Teaching and Learning has a useful resource describing the process of creating rubrics. Your comments about the following rubric are welcome via email

Criterion and Weight Exemplary Sufficient Developing Needs Improvement
Exploration (3) Thorough Somewhat thorough Somewhat superficial Not at all thorough
Content Testing (3) Questions are answered thoroughly and with specificity Questions are answered somewhat thoroughly and with specificity Answers are not thorough and somewhat vague Answers are not thorough nor specific
Observations (2) Report clearly consolidates observations from all group members Report consolidates observations from all group members Report consolidates observations from some group members Observations not consolidated
Recommendations (2) Clear recommendations about content Clear recommendations about most of the content Recommendations about some of the content Recommendations not clear
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Project Deliverable ()

  • Marks: 20
  • Due Date: 13-Apr-2022 @ 23:59

Project Deliverable

This is either an INDIVIDUAL or a GROUP assignment. It can be done individually or with others.

Your project can involve (for example): a book review, a wikipedia entry, researching smaller assessment/why questions, discussion of contributing to an open source project (on github, for example), writing some code to test an idea, and so forth.

As a reminder, your project must deal with class themes in some way. It is important to realize the project that you proposed (changes from the proposal, if necessary, are permitted) and connect it our discussions this semester. Your ideas about those connections are important.

Submission

Upload your finished product (as a pdf or as a link) to UR Courses.

Grading
Grade penalties will be applied in the following situations for assignment submissions:
  • on time but the written instructions for the submission were not followed: deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late (but within 48 hours of the due date and time): deduct 10% of the earned grade
  • late by more than 48 hours: deduct 50% of the earned grade
  • academic dishonesty: deduct 100% of the earned grade

This assignment is worth 20 marks, according to the following rubric:

Rubric

DePaul Univerity’s Center for Teaching and Learning has a useful resource describing the process of creating rubrics. Your comments about the following rubric are welcome via email

Criterion and Weight Exemplary Sufficient Developing Needs Improvement
Topic (4) Actively engages an important issue related to class Engages an important issue related to class Somewhat engages an important issue related to class Does not engage an important issue related to class
Deliverable (4) Deliverable is used appropriately and imaginatively Deliverable is used appropriately Deliverable is used somewhat appropriately Deliverable is not used appropriately
Realization (4) Realization of approach is clear and well-formed Realization of approach is reasonable Realization of approach is mostly unclear and not well-formed Realization of approach is not clear
Connections to Class Discussions (4) Thoroughly connected Reasonably thoroughly connected Somewhat connected Not connected
Completed Plan (4) Ambitious and thorough Reasonably thorough Somewhat thorough Not thorough
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Exams

From previous offerings: